Author Topic: 73 TX500 Resto  (Read 16033 times)

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Offline mvluv13

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Re: 73 TX500 Resto
« Reply #15 on: November 05, 2014, 11:13:47 PM »
Nice job MVLUV13, considering your move etc.
Did you find the source of the original oil leaks?
Were the original cases painted? I would have thought the soda blasting would have been enough
RegardZ.
The original oil leaks were a little hard to source as the whole motor was covered in it, and I didn't worry too much about it as I was doing a top end rebiuld anyway.
However since I have had it running I have attended to oil leaks from the rocker cover, final drive output shaft and tacho cable connection point.
The cases were just scratched and lightly corroded. I wanted a polished finish and research showed sodablasting would give a dull matt finish.
The polishing was probably the most labour intensive part of the resto. Starting with 400 grit wet, I went up incrementally to 2000 grit then black rouge on the buffing wheel, then white rouge, then finally autosol metal polish by hand.
I did this to the 3 engine side covers, carb bowls and vac chambers and the front brake lever.

Offline Garn

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Re: 73 TX500 Resto
« Reply #16 on: November 06, 2014, 07:43:17 AM »
Thanks for the reply, however, my mistake, regarding cases. I met the actiual enginebody not the covers (which I agree should be polished).
Did you paint them or leave them soda blasted?
RegardZ.
Kawasaki Z1, Z1A, Z1B, Z900-A4 and TX500A
    Sydney, Australia

Offline mvluv13

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Re: 73 TX500 Resto
« Reply #17 on: November 06, 2014, 08:10:04 PM »
Thanks for the reply, however, my mistake, regarding cases. I met the actiual enginebody not the covers (which I agree should be polished).
Did you paint them or leave them soda blasted?
RegardZ.
Hi Garn,

I originally wanted to leave the engine bare after the soda blasting however the years of oil stain did not leave the cylinders or the cases a consistant colour. I decided to paint at home useing VHT high temp engine paint which you can get in a cast aliminium colour. If you look at post #11 you can see the finished product on a stand.

Offline Wally

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Re: 73 TX500 Resto
« Reply #18 on: November 07, 2014, 06:48:08 AM »
How did you find the VHT? I used Duplicolour on mine after sandblasting and I found the paint is chipping off super easy. Baking it in the oven didn't even seem to help

Offline mvluv13

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Re: 73 TX500 Resto
« Reply #19 on: November 08, 2014, 12:27:23 AM »
How did you find the VHT? I used Duplicolour on mine after sandblasting and I found the paint is chipping off super easy. Baking it in the oven didn't even seem to help
I ordered it through Repco. They don't normally stock VHT at my local shop as it is pretty small but they are more than happy to order in. I gave it 4 reasonable coats after a dusting coat and it seems to be holding up well.

Offline mvluv13

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Re: 73 TX500 Resto
« Reply #20 on: November 13, 2014, 09:29:08 PM »
Once we had spent a few weeks in the new (old) house I was eager to get back to work on the bike. I had put off doing wheels and forks as I needed it mobile to wheel around with the move.
So off with the wheels and forks. I was looking forward to this part as I knew visually it  was going to be a big leap for the project.
Another reason I was looking forward to it was I had intended to re-build the wheels myself, which I haven't done before.

Offline mvluv13

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Re: 73 TX500 Resto
« Reply #21 on: November 13, 2014, 10:25:24 PM »
The plan with the wheels was to re chrome the rims, powder coat the hubs and lace stainless spokes in.
I had investigated replacing the rims with some new alloy ones which would have been cheaper. However maintaining originality is more important than reducing unspring weight. Tyres were a challenge to remove. I checked the date stamp and they were both mid 80's vintage and rock hard.
A better plan would have been to attempt after a couple of hours in the sun.
The other challenge was the sprocket carrier/cush drive removal from the rear hub. I remounted the sprocket with a couple of turns on the bolts, then packed underneath the sprocket and wound the cush drive up towards the sprocket. Pic displays it better.

Offline mvluv13

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Re: 73 TX500 Resto
« Reply #22 on: November 13, 2014, 10:45:04 PM »
Two other areas that required attention with regard to chrome were headers and fork inner tubes.
After inspecting headers I found the bottom sweep near the muffler joint was cracked and quite thin.
After talking with a motorcycle exhaust specialist the plan was to cut about 250mm off the end and weld a new bend section in.
Once that was done I shipped them off with the rims to the chrome platers.
The other area that needed attention as mentioned was the
forks. The hard chroming surface was very ordinary and would be a waste of time putting new seals in that would be torn up in no time. So I dropped them off to one of the few places in Aus that specializes in fork hard chroming (which by coincidence is about 10klms from my home).


Offline mvluv13

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Re: 73 TX500 Resto
« Reply #23 on: January 26, 2015, 01:30:24 AM »
So at this stage all of my outsourcing work was complete.
Forks hard chromed resealed and the lowers polished.
« Last Edit: January 26, 2015, 01:34:08 AM by mvluv13 »

Offline mvluv13

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Re: 73 TX500 Resto
« Reply #24 on: January 26, 2015, 01:38:09 AM »
 Hubs have been powder coated and rims have been chromed.
I thought I would have a go at lacing and trueing the rims myself which I am now glad I did.
I found it a very relaxing and enjoyable experience. After loosely lacing the rims up I put the new bearings and seals in and mounted the wheels on the bike. Then clamped some pieces of wood to the hoist and set a steel rule to the wheel and that was my wheel trueing stand.



Offline mvluv13

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Re: 73 TX500 Resto
« Reply #25 on: January 26, 2015, 01:42:43 AM »
I also re-furbed the switch blocks which were scratched and in general poor condition inside and out.



Offline mvluv13

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Re: 73 TX500 Resto
« Reply #26 on: January 26, 2015, 01:46:32 AM »
I also repainted the triple trees while they were out. They weren't particularly bad however while they are out......
also found good tapered bearings in there so flushed them out and re packed them.


Offline mvluv13

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Re: 73 TX500 Resto
« Reply #27 on: January 26, 2015, 01:49:17 AM »
Next was to get the front brakes sorted. The master cyl is seized and the caliper doesn't look much better. I plan to simplify the system by having one flexible line with the pressure switch at the banjo bolt at the master cyl.
I don't understand why Yamaha made it such a complicated system with two hard lines and two flexible lines.
Also on the list is get the headlight bucket on and start working through the wiring. As it was all disconnected when I purchased the bike I will be starting from scratch.
The ignition part works as I have connected that part to test run the bike, however lights, indicators, horn are all un tested as yet.

Offline mvluv13

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Re: 73 TX500 Resto
« Reply #28 on: January 26, 2015, 01:52:28 AM »
A little more progress of late. Indicators, headlight bucket installed and wiring looms connected and tested. Everything worked bar the flashing of the indicators which was only the flashing unit. $10 and walk to the local auto parts store and it was fixed, I even managed to fit it in the original relay housing.

For some reason the PO pumped a heap of silicone between the headlight and the outer chrome ring that fits on the headlight bucket. The only reasons I can think of is to stop water getting into the headlight bucket or to stop it from rattling around.
It has taken me several hours so far to clean with about 10% more to go.

Offline mvluv13

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Re: 73 TX500 Resto
« Reply #29 on: January 26, 2015, 02:06:14 AM »
As these posts are retrospective I look back at the pictures and see where the challenging periods were and the front brakes were definitely one of them.
I intended to replace all parts with new in the interest of safety and go to a single braided line with a banjo bolt intergrated pressure switch.
bleeding process went fine until I started to get a firm lever then the lever would not return.
After some time and trying every technique found on the web I pulled the master cyl apart and found a split seal.
Great. After contacting the vendor in the UK (rremember that I'm in Australia) they agreed to send a replacement seal kit out.